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Photos: Redeye Theater

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Photos: Redeye Theater

Grippi, Aluise and Mullen during the finale of “The Midnight Snack.”

Grippi, Aluise and Mullen during the finale of “The Midnight Snack.”

Bader Abdulmajeed | Staff Photographer

Grippi, Aluise and Mullen during the finale of “The Midnight Snack.”

Bader Abdulmajeed | Staff Photographer

Bader Abdulmajeed | Staff Photographer

Grippi, Aluise and Mullen during the finale of “The Midnight Snack.”

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Redeye Theater hosted its second 24-hour playwriting, producing and performance event of the semester this weekend. Students worked through the night to produce and perform five original plays and musicals — “The Midnight Snack,” “Frog Bones Can’t Handle That Kind of Stress,” “The Case of the Missing Page,” “Camp Cuba” and “Birdth of Prey.” Here are photos from the rehearsals and performances that led up to the event.

Bader Abdulmajeed | Staff Photographer
Mohit Patel, a senior and playwright, sketches out details for the play “The Case of the Missing Page.”

Bader Abdulmajeed | Staff Photographer
John McFarlane (center) and John “JP” Held (left) play detective and assistant detective and talk to their client in Redeye’s play, “The Case of the Missing Page,” a Sherlock-esque parody in which a detective and his assistant are waiting for a client to appear when a woman bursts in saying her dog was kidnapped.

Bader Abdulmajeed | Staff Photographer
Jacob Aluise (center right) and Leann Mullen (far right) act as couple opposed by a cannibal duo played by Gaspare Grippi (center left) and Rachel Saula (far left) in “The Midnight Snack,” a tale about two cannibals who attend a dinner party intent on eating the host couple.

Bader Abdulmajeed | Staff Photographer
character (right) attempts to convince Mullen’s to allow him to eat her.

Bader Abdulmajeed | Staff Photographer
Grippi (left) and Saula’s (right) characters discuss how they will cannibalize their fellow humans.

Bader Abdulmajeed | Staff Photographer
Grippi’s character (center) prepares for a rock, paper, scissors showdown with Aluise’s to determine whether the non-cannibal couple would be set free.

Bader Abdulmajeed | Staff Photographer
Zev Woskoff, director in residence on the executive board of Redeye Theatre Project, dances along to music with a prop before the performances.

Bader Abdulmajeed | Staff Photographer
Grippi (left) and Saula’s (right) characters attempt to convince Mullen’s (center) that it is her destiny to be eaten.

Bader Abdulmajeed | Staff Photographer
In the second play of the night, Morgan Gilmer’s character is part of a lesbians-only club for witches who can turn themselves into frogs. The title refers to when one of the witches’ bones collapsed after she turned back into a human because “Frog Bones Can’t Handle That Kind of Stress.”

Bader Abdulmajeed | Staff Photographer
Malcolm Buisch plays a transformed falcon in the “Birdth of Prey,” which told the story of a man who turned into a falcon after a spell was cast on him, and his quest to escape his curse.

Bader Abdulmajeed | Staff Photographer
Eli Wissenbach, Sarah Sokolowski and Nick DePinto manage Redeye’s audio and lighting equipment.

Bader Abdulmajeed | Staff Photographer
Kayla Bradley’s character asks the detectives for help in the “The Case of the Missing Page.”

Bader Abdulmajeed | Staff Photographer
Wissenbach tests the house lights before the shows Saturday evening. The show was held in the basement floor of the Cathedral of Learning in the Studio Theater.

Bader Abdulmajeed | Staff Photographer
DePinto conducts a sound check before Saturday evenings performances.

Bader Abdulmajeed | Staff Photographer
The Redeye Theatre Project cast and crew warm up with a chant before their show.

Bader Abdulmajeed | Staff Photographer
A donation box for the Redeye project sits outside the show’s entrance. This year, The Redeye Theatre Project received OCC funding for props and costumes, and sold T-shirts to raise money.

Bader Abdulmajeed | Staff Photographer
Dustin “Good Times” Butoryak, Redeye Theatre Project’s artistic director, closes out the night’s performances. Correction: Redeye received funding from OCC, not SGB. 

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Photos: Redeye Theater