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New York Knicks forward Precious Achiuwa (5) shoots over Philadelphia 76ers guard Kelly Oubre Jr., rear, in red, during the first half of an NBA basketball game in New York on Sunday, March 10, 2024. (AP Photo/Peter K. Afriyie)
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By Aidan Kasner, Sports Editor • May 23, 2024
Opinion | Do not arrest peaceful protesters
By Livia LaMarca, Assistant Opinions Editor • May 23, 2024

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New York Knicks forward Precious Achiuwa (5) shoots over Philadelphia 76ers guard Kelly Oubre Jr., rear, in red, during the first half of an NBA basketball game in New York on Sunday, March 10, 2024. (AP Photo/Peter K. Afriyie)
Column | Former Villanova fanatic watches “Nova Knicks” take down Sixers in NBA Playoffs
By Aidan Kasner, Sports Editor • May 23, 2024
Opinion | Do not arrest peaceful protesters
By Livia LaMarca, Assistant Opinions Editor • May 23, 2024

Opinion | Journalism is not a crime

Palestinians+look+at+the+destruction+after+an+Israeli+strike+in+Rafah%2C+southern+Gaza+Strip+onSaturday%2C+Jan.+27.
AP Photo/Fatima Shbair
Palestinians look at the destruction after an Israeli strike in Rafah, southern Gaza Strip onSaturday, Jan. 27.

Killing journalists is a war crime. There is not a single government or military in the world that is unaware of this fact. Press and media employees are meant to have immunity during military attacks, even in the extremely rare case that they are producing propaganda. 

Before October of 2023, the highest number of journalists killed in a violent conflict was 69, who were killed over the course of six years during World War II. During the 20-year American invasion of Vietnam, 63 journalists were killed. Most recently, Israel’s military has killed at least 92 Palestinian journalists and media workers in four months. Here are their names.

Mohammad Al-Salhi, Fourth Authority, shot dead on Oct. 7.

Ibrahim Lafi, Ain Media, killed on Oct. 7.

Mohammad Jarghoun, Smart media, killed on Oct. 7.

Asaad Shamlakh, freelancer, killed with his family in an airstrike on Oct. 8.

Salam Meimah, Al Quds Radio, killed in an airstrike in the Jabalia refugee camp on Oct. 10.

Said Al-Tawil, director of Al-Khamisa news agency, killed by an airstrike on a residential building on Oct. 10.

Mohammed Sobboh, photojournalist at Khabar News agency, killed by an airstrike on a residential building on Oct. 10.

Hisham Al-Nawahjh, photographer, Khabar news agency, killed by an airstrike on a residential building on Oct. 10.

Mohammed Fayez Yousef Abu Matar, freelancer, killed in a bombing on Oct. 11.

Ahmed Shehab, producer of Voice of Prisoners Radio, killed alongside members of his family in an airstrike on the Jabalia refugee camp on Oct. 12.

Hossam Mubarak, Al Aqsa TV, killed in a shelling attack on Oct. 13.

Yousef Dawwas, freelancer, killed alongside his family in an airstrike on Oct. 14.

Abdul Hadi Habib, Al Aqsa TV, killed in a bombing. He died in his home on Oct. 16.

Isam Bahar, Al Aqsa TV, killed in a bombing. He died in his home on Oct. 17.

Mohammed Balousha, Palestine TV, killed in a bombing. He died in his home on Oct. 17.

Samih Al-Nadi, Al Aqsa TV producer and director, killed in an aircraft bombing on Oct. 18.

Khalil Abu Athra, cameraman for Al Aqsa TV, killed on Oct. 19.

Muhammad Abu Ali, Al-Shabab Radio, killed by shelling. He died in his home on Oct. 20.

Hani Madhoun, Al Aqsa TV, killed in an airstrike. He died in his home on Oct. 21.

Roshdi Sarraj, photojournalist, filmmaker and co-founder of Ain Media, killed in an air raid. He died in his home on Oct. 22.

Mohammed Imad Labad, Al Resalah News, killed in a bombing on Oct. 23.

Jamal Al-Faqawi, Mithaq Media Network, killed in a bombing. He died in his home on Oct. 25.

Saed Al-Halabi, Al Aqsa TV, killed in a targeted attack. He died in his home on Oct. 25.

Ahmed Abu Mahadi, Al Aqsa TV, killed in an airstrike on Oct. 25.

Salma Mukhaimar, freelancer, killed in an airstrike on Oct. 25.

Zaher Al-Afghani, Mithaq Media, killed on Oct. 25.

Duaa Sharaf, Al Aqsa Radio, killed in a missile attack. She died in her home on Oct. 26.

Mohammad Fayez Al Hassani, director general of Rawasi, killed in an airstrike. He died in his home on Oct. 26.

Yasser Abu Namous, Al Sahel media, killed in an airstrike. He died in his home on Oct. 26.

Nazmi Al-Nadim, Palestine TV, killed in a plane bombardement. He died in his home on Oct. 30.

Majd Kashkou, Palestine TV, killed in an airstrike on Oct. 31.

Imad Wahidi, Palestine TV, killed in an airstrike on Oct. 31.

Majd Fadl Arandas, Al-Jamahir, killed during a bombing near his house on Nov. 1.

Mohammad Abu Hatab, Palestine TV correspondent, killed in an airstrike. He died in his home on Nov. 2.

Mohammed Bayyari, Al Aqsa TV, killed on Nov. 2.

Iyad Matar, Al Aqsa TV, killed in a bombardment. He died in his home on Nov. 2.

Mohammed Al Jajeh, Press House, killed in an airstrike on Nov. 6.

Mohammad Abu Hasira, Palestine News and WAFA Information Agency, killed in a bombing on Nov. 7

Yahya Abu Munie, Al Aqsa radio, killed in an airstrike on Nov. 7.

Ahmed Al-Qara, photojournalist on Nov. 10.

Mousa Al Barsh, Namaa Radio executive director, killed in an airstrike. He died in his home on Nov. 12.

Ahmed Fatmah, photographer, Al Qahera News, killed in an airstrike on Nov. 13.

Yacoub Bursh, director general of Namaa Radio, killed in an airstrike. He died in his home on Nov. 14.

Mahmoud Matar, freelancer, killed in an airstrike. He died in his home on Nov. 15.

Moseab Ashour, photographer, killed in an attack on the Nuseirat refugee camp on Nov. 18.

Mustafa Al-Sawaf, writer and journalist, killed in an airstrike along his wife and two of his children. They died in their home on Nov. 18.

Amr Abu Hayya, Al Aqsa TV, killed in an airstrike, Nov. 18.

Saary Mansour, Quds News Network, killed in an airstrike on the Bureij refugee camp on Nov. 18.

Hassouneh Isleem, photographer, Quds News, killed in an airstrike on the Bureij refugee camp on Nov. 18.

Abdelhalim Awad, Al Aqsa TV, killed in an airstrike. He died in his home on Nov. 18.

Bilal Jadallah, Press House director general, killed in an airstrike. He died in his car on Nov. 19.

Ayat Al-Khaddura, digital and broadcast journalist, killed in an airstrike after posting a video from her home documenting the siege in Gaza on Nov. 20.

Khamis Salem Deab, Al Quds radio, killed in an airstrike. He died in his home on Nov. 20.

Jamal Hanieh, editor, Amwaj Sports Media Network, killed in a bombing on Nov. 21.

Mohamad Nabil Al-Zaq, Quds TV, killed in an airstrike on Nov. 22.

Assem Al-Barsh, Palestinian Al-Ray Radio, shot by a sniper on Nov. 22.

Muhammad Moin Ayyash, photojournalist, killed along with various family members in an airstrike. They died in their home in the Nuseirat refugee camp on Nov. 23.

Amal Zahed, journalist, killed in an airstrike on Nov. 24.

Mustafa Bakir, journalist and cameraman, Al Aqsa TV, killed in an airstrike on the Nuseirat refugee camp. He died in his home on Nov. 24.

Nader Al-Nazli, Palestine TV, found under the rubble of his house one week after it was bombed. He died in his home, and was found Nov. 25.

Abdallah Darwish, photojournalist, Al Aqsa TV, killed in a raid on Dec. 1.

Muntaser Al-Sawaf, photographer, Anadolu, killed in an airstrike. He died in his home on Dec. 1.

Marwan Al-Sawaf, photojournalist, Alef Media, Muntaser’s brother, killed in the same airstrike. He died in his home on Dec. 1.

Adham Hassouna, freelancer, killed in an airstrike on Dec. 1.

Hassan Farajallah, Al Quds TV, killed in a bombing on Dec. 3.

Shaima Jazzar, freelancer, Al Hayat newspaper, Majedat Rafah network, killed with nine members of her family in a bombing in Rafah. She died in her home on Dec. 4.

Ala Atallah, journalist, killed in an airstrike in the Al-Daraj neighborhood. She was killed along with nine members of her family on Dec. 9.

Mohamed Abu Samra, photojournalist, killed in a bombing on Dec. 4.

Duaa Jabbour, freelancer, Eyes Media Network, killed in an airstrike on Khan Yunis. She died along with her family in her home on Dec. 9.

Narmeen Qawwas, intern, Russia Today, killed in an airstrike. She died in her home on Dec. 11.

Abdul Karim Odeh, journalist, former Al-Mayadeen correspondent, killed in an airstrike on the Nuseirat refugee camp on Dec. 13.

Samer Abu Daqqa, cameraman, Al Jazeera, killed in a drone strike while he covered the consequences of an Israeli strike on a school in Khan Yunis on Dec. 15.

Assem Kamal Moussa, Palestine Now, killed in an airstrike on Khan Yunis. He died in his home on Dec. 16. 

Haneen Ali Al-Qashtan, Sawt Al Watan Radio, killed in a bombing on the Nuseirat refugee camp. She died with her family on Dec. 17.

Abdallah Alwan, Midan contributor, killed in an airstrike on the Jabalia refugee camp. He died in his home on Dec. 18.

Mohammad Nasser Abu Hweidy, Al Istiqlal, killed while working on Dec. 22.

Ahmad Jamal Madhoun, deputy director of the Al Rai agency, killed in an airstrike on Dec. 23.

Mohammad Khalifa, director at Al Aqsa TV, killed in a targeted airstrike. He died in his home on Dec. 24.

Mohammad Abdul Khaleq Al Ghuf, photojournalist, Al Rai, killed while working on Dec. 24.

Huthaifa Lulu, broadcast engineer, Al Quds TV, Prisoner’s Radio, killed in a targeted airstrike. He and his family died in their home on Dec. 24.

Mohammad Khair Al Din, archiving officer, Al Aqsa TV, killed in a targeted airstrike. He died in his home on Dec. 28.

Ahmad Khair Al Din, photojournalist, Al Aqsa TV, killed in a targeted airstrike. He died in his home on Dec. 28.

Jaber Abu Hedrous, correspondent, Al-Quds Channel, killed in an airstrike. He died in his home on Dec. 29.

Akram Al-Shafei, correspondent, Safa News Agency, died from injuries sustained in an airstrike two months prior during the siege of Al-Shifa hospital on Jan. 5.

Hamza Al-Dahdouh, Al Jazeera, son of Al Jazeera’s Gaza bureau chief, killed in a targeted drone strike on his car onJan 7.

Mustafa Thuraya, videographer, Agence France Presse, killed alongside Hamza Al-Dahdouh on Jan. 7.

Heba Al-Abdallah, killed in a bombing. She died in her home on Jan. 9.

Ahmad Bdeir, Hadaf News, killed in the bombing of the Al-Aqsa Martyrs Hospital on Jan. 10.

Mohammed Jamal Sabahi Al Thalathini, Al Quds TV, killed in an airstrike. He died in his home on Jan. 11.

Yazan Al-Zuweidi, Al-Ghad TV, killed in an airstrike on Jan 14.

Iyad Ahmed Al-Ruwahi, Al Aqsa Radio, killed alongside his family in an airstrike on the Nuseirat refugee camp. They died in their home on Jan. 26.

Mohamed Abdel El Fatah Atta Allah, editor, Al-Risala, killed alongside his family in a bombing of Al Shati refugee camp. They died in their home on Jan. 29.

This is the longest article I have ever written, and it is just a list of names. I had to take out their ages, in the cases when they were known, the cities and neighborhoods where they died and the family members that died with them. 

Extremely credible accusations that Israel targets journalists have circulated for months, and still the international community has not stepped in to investigate these clear war crimes, or even to prevent them. Every day, I hear less and less people talking about Palestine. I wonder, sometimes, if they realize that it is fading from their field of vision because those who broadcast the reality are dying in airstrikes on their homes, in drone strikes on their cars, shot to death by snipers or killed while on the job, in their press vests.

Many people in my generation have learned more about the reality in Gaza from journalists with large social media presences, like 24-year-old Motaz Azaiza, 25-year-old Bisan Owda and 22-year-old Plestia Alaqad. They are barely older than most of us, begging the world to stop denying the horrors they are documenting. When they don’t post for a while, I think most of us hold our breath, wondering if they are the next names on that list, sentenced to death for telling the truth. Azaiza and Alaqad both recently had to leave Gaza for their own safety. 

14 of these journalists and media workers who I’ve listed died with their families. 11 of them died in attacks on refugee camps. At least 13 of them died while working, or in targeted airstrikes after their coverage was observed by the Israeli government. 42 of them died in their own homes. 

I can already hear the denial of the brutal reality at hand — I know that there are those callous or blind enough to ignore these men and women. All of them were either fathers or mothers, brothers or sisters, sons or daughters. All of them were committed individuals with so much more to offer the world, all of them torn apart in a manner so painful that I don’t think most of us can comprehend it. I know that there are those that would insist that if they died at home, they were not targets, but mere “casualties of war.”

That, I think, tells us everything we need to know. Supporters of this “war” want us to rest assured that these men and women were not torn apart by Israeli airstrikes because they were journalists — not at all. We should take comfort in knowing that they were killed simply for being Palestinian. 

Sofia Uriagereka-Herburger writes about politics and international and domestic social movements. Write to her at [email protected]

About the Contributor
Sofia Uriagereka-Herburger, Senior Staff Columnist
Sofia Uriagereka is a senior majoring in Anthropology. She writes primarily about politics, both domestic and international.