The University of Pittsburgh's Daily Student Newspaper

The Pitt News

The University of Pittsburgh's Daily Student Newspaper

The Pitt News

The University of Pittsburgh's Daily Student Newspaper

The Pitt News

Join our newsletter

Get Pitt and Oakland news in your inbox, three times a week.

New York Knicks forward Precious Achiuwa (5) shoots over Philadelphia 76ers guard Kelly Oubre Jr., rear, in red, during the first half of an NBA basketball game in New York on Sunday, March 10, 2024. (AP Photo/Peter K. Afriyie)
Column | Former Villanova fanatic watches “Nova Knicks” take down Sixers in NBA Playoffs
By Aidan Kasner, Sports Editor • May 23, 2024
Opinion | Do not arrest peaceful protesters
By Livia LaMarca, Assistant Opinions Editor • May 23, 2024

Join our newsletter

Get Pitt and Oakland news in your inbox, three times a week.

New York Knicks forward Precious Achiuwa (5) shoots over Philadelphia 76ers guard Kelly Oubre Jr., rear, in red, during the first half of an NBA basketball game in New York on Sunday, March 10, 2024. (AP Photo/Peter K. Afriyie)
Column | Former Villanova fanatic watches “Nova Knicks” take down Sixers in NBA Playoffs
By Aidan Kasner, Sports Editor • May 23, 2024
Opinion | Do not arrest peaceful protesters
By Livia LaMarca, Assistant Opinions Editor • May 23, 2024

Opinion | Once upon a time, we grew up and left our passions behind

Opinion+%7C+Once+upon+a+time%2C+we+grew+up+and+left+our+passions+behind
Carrington Bryan | Staff Illustrator

There once was a girl who had a passion for reading. She would nestle herself in the coziest corner of any room, undeterred by noise or crowds, and lose herself in the pages of fantastical worlds. Whether she was wearing a Hogwarts robe or a majestic princess gown, her imagination knew no bounds. But alas, she grew up, and now she finds herself spending more time perusing LinkedIn job descriptions than of her beloved novels.

Transitioning into adulthood and securing employment is a universal journey that all individuals embark on — it’s an anticipated phase of life. However, recently, I’ve found myself reflecting on the activities I once cherished but now struggle to find time for. It’s not a matter of resentment towards the impossibility of reading incessantly — that’s simply unrealistic. Rather, it’s about grappling with the realization that we often leave behind significant aspects of ourselves along this journey.

You might reminisce about a time when your aspirations were as simple as being a painter or a lifelong dog walker. But as we ventured into high school, the weight of responsibilities dawned upon us, and the stark reality of financial independence became evident. We found ourselves pondering over majors — finance, marketing, engineering or anything promising a secure job. Gone were the days of dreaming about sketching or running quaint bookshops.

My desire to become a librarian and the desire to buy a house did not go hand in hand, so I had to leave one behind. I opted to major in biology, crafting my life’s blueprint around the pursuit of medical school and a career in medicine. However, the journey to becoming a doctor demands more than just a desire for financial stability — it necessitates a deep-seated passion. As graduation looms three weeks away, I can tell you that medical school isn’t in my future.

Allow me to clarify — this article isn’t about urging you to abandon your pre-medical aspirations and pursue a career in the arts. Instead, it serves as a gentle nudge to rediscover the joy of pursuing your passions amidst life’s tumult. For seniors, this might pose a particular challenge, as the relentless pursuit of employment since October has left us consumed by thoughts of student loans and leases.

For some of you, the path after graduation may seem crystal clear, with a major you adore leading straight to a secure job — an absolute dream scenario. Yet, for others like myself, the journey to post-graduation life remains a puzzle waiting to be solved. Whether you’re grappling with a major you loathe and seeking any job to escape it, or you’re wrestling with finding employment within your chosen field, take a moment to simply breathe.

The crucial first step is to take a moment and contemplate what truly resonates with you. Set your major aside momentarily and visualize the type of workday you would willingly embrace for eight hours. Whether it’s immersed in a laboratory, bustling around a law firm, tending to patients in a hospital or engaging in academia at a university, ask yourself if you can see yourself enduring that environment five days a week.

The next crucial step is determining your immediate living situation. Rushing to sign a lease without a stable job can pose financial risks. Contrary to common beliefs, moving back in with your parents can offer a practical and supportive solution during this transitional period. It’s important to assess your options with practicality and set aside any hesitations rooted in pride.

You might be wondering at this point when our passions seamlessly translate into our entire future, and I’m here to share that sometimes they don’t — at least not immediately. My dream of establishing a cottage-style bookstore adorned with coffee and flowers is a bit more complicated than it sounds. This is where hobbies come in. 

Generations preceding us often imparted the notion that our jobs define our existence. However, that’s their paradigm, not ours to bear. If your workday concludes at five, act like it. Unwind by spreading a picnic blanket under a tree and enjoy a novel. Reach out to a friend and enjoy a drink together. My only request is that you take a moment to honor the younger version of yourself who once cherished something dearly — give them a chance to relive those moments once more.

I’m delighted to share that I’ve been double majoring in philosophy alongside pre-med this entire time. Despite the warnings that it’s a field with limited job prospects, I’ve been drawn to the reading, writing and philosophical exploration it offers. Opting for a gap year or two, I’ll be living at home with my parents to save up for my future pursuit of a doctorate in philosophy. And in case you’re wondering, I won’t be immediately working within my field, but that’s OK, because I trust that eventually, I’ll find my way.

Moral of our story is, we’re going to be fine. The majority of us are still in our 20s. It’s bewildering how someone convinced us that by 25, we’d have it all — marriage, children, a house and a thriving career — because frankly, they couldn’t be more mistaken. Our passions did not die. They will always be there — just remember to acknowledge them from time to time.

Nada Abdulaziz loves writing about anything philosophy related — to chat about Aristotle email her at [email protected].

About the Contributor
Nada Abdulaziz, Senior Staff Writer
Nada Abdulaziz is a senior majoring in Philosophy and Biological Sciences. She loves spending her free time reading, hiking, and watching Studio Ghibli films.