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The Pitt News

The University of Pittsburgh's Daily Student Newspaper

The Pitt News

The University of Pittsburgh's Daily Student Newspaper

The Pitt News

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New York Knicks forward Precious Achiuwa (5) shoots over Philadelphia 76ers guard Kelly Oubre Jr., rear, in red, during the first half of an NBA basketball game in New York on Sunday, March 10, 2024. (AP Photo/Peter K. Afriyie)
Column | Former Villanova fanatic watches “Nova Knicks” take down Sixers in NBA Playoffs
By Aidan Kasner, Sports Editor • May 23, 2024
Opinion | Do not arrest peaceful protesters
By Livia LaMarca, Assistant Opinions Editor • May 23, 2024

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Get Pitt and Oakland news in your inbox, three times a week.

New York Knicks forward Precious Achiuwa (5) shoots over Philadelphia 76ers guard Kelly Oubre Jr., rear, in red, during the first half of an NBA basketball game in New York on Sunday, March 10, 2024. (AP Photo/Peter K. Afriyie)
Column | Former Villanova fanatic watches “Nova Knicks” take down Sixers in NBA Playoffs
By Aidan Kasner, Sports Editor • May 23, 2024
Opinion | Do not arrest peaceful protesters
By Livia LaMarca, Assistant Opinions Editor • May 23, 2024

Campus Life | Everything college has taught me

Campus Life is a biweekly blog about the everyday things happening around Pitt’s campus.
Campus+Life+%7C+Everything+college+has+taught+me
TPN File Illustration

As I graduate in just a few weeks, I’d like to reflect on all of the things my college experience has taught me. Some things I naturally learned along the way, but others I learned the hard way after going through some troubles.

The first is that you are your own best friend. In college, you do not have your parents or siblings to hold your hand and tell you what to do or what not to do. Sometimes, your friends might not have your best interest at heart and won’t tell you the advice that you need to hear. 

I figured out that it is important to listen to myself, trust my gut and make decisions that are good for me. This meant saying no to things that did not feel right, even though other people were saying yes. It also meant spending time alone, getting to know myself better and understanding what I really wanted out of my college experience. Embracing the idea of being my own best friend helped me navigate the ups and downs of college life with more confidence and less fear. 

The second thing I learned is how to manage my time. I’m usually the type of person to procrastinate everything until the last minute, and while that sometimes does work and the job gets done, it is not the most effective. With classes, homework and extracurricular activities, sometimes it feels like there is never enough time. But I learned to make a schedule and stick with it. 

I also learned to finish my homework right as it gets assigned, because most times, homework for different classes are due on the same day. This helped me not only get my work done but also to find time to myself. By breaking down large assignments into smaller, manageable tasks, I found that I could progress steadily without feeling overwhelmed. Embracing these habits of effective time management not only improved my academic performance but also enhanced my overall well-being by ensuring that I had time for relaxing and self-care.

Another lesson I learned is how to stay financially smart. During my first year, I found myself spending a lot of money to do fun activities with my friends, like going out to dinners and exploring Pittsburgh. While it is fun to do these things occasionally, I quickly realized that doing them all the time was draining my bank account faster than I expected. I had to cut back on doing these things for a while to help my spending. While it was not easy at first, my friends and I found creative ways to have fun without spending a lot of money. We would have movie nights, cook dinners together and explore free events around Pittsburgh. This taught me that enjoying my college experience does not always require a lot of money — it is more about the people you spend your time with. 

Lastly, college taught me that it is okay to ask for help. I was always the shy person in high school that never raised her hand to answer a question unless I was called on and never spoke up about a question I had. However, during my first semester of classes here at Pitt, I realized that I could no longer sit back and hope that my questions would be answered. If I was uncomfortable speaking up in class, I would go see my professor after class or during office hours. If I did not want to go to the professor, I would go to the teaching assistant or ask someone in class. 

This also applied to my mental health. If I was ever feeling down, instead of bottling up my emotions, I figured that it is okay to reach out to friends for some help and that they are more than happy to guide you through whatever it is that you are feeling. It showed me that asking for help isn’t a weakness — it is a smart way to handle problems. 

Hopefully, some of these lessons that I learned during my four years at Pitt will help you navigate your college experience. Remember to still have fun and let loose at times, but also to prioritize what is important so you get the best out of your own college experience! 

Shriya writes primarily about her everyday experiences on Pitt’s campus. Talk to them at [email protected].

About the Contributor
Shriya Yadamreddi, Senior Staff Writer