The University of Pittsburgh's Daily Student Newspaper

The Pitt News

The University of Pittsburgh's Daily Student Newspaper

The Pitt News

The University of Pittsburgh's Daily Student Newspaper

The Pitt News

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Column | Caitlin Clark adapts to life in the WNBA
Column | Caitlin Clark adapts to life in the WNBA
By James Carter, Staff Writer • June 20, 2024
Opinion | NHL needs to bring specialty jerseys back
By Jameson Keebler, Senior Staff Columnist • June 19, 2024
Opinion | Hold your elected officials morally responsible
By Livia LaMarca, Assistant Opinions Editor • June 18, 2024

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Column | Caitlin Clark adapts to life in the WNBA
Column | Caitlin Clark adapts to life in the WNBA
By James Carter, Staff Writer • June 20, 2024
Opinion | NHL needs to bring specialty jerseys back
By Jameson Keebler, Senior Staff Columnist • June 19, 2024
Opinion | Hold your elected officials morally responsible
By Livia LaMarca, Assistant Opinions Editor • June 18, 2024

Opinion | Pittsburgh underdogs who didn’t quite win The Pitt News’ ‘Best Of’

Layne%E2%80%99s+Chicken+Fingers+on+Forbes+Avenue.
Hannah Levine | Staff Photographer
Layne’s Chicken Fingers on Forbes Avenue.

The winners of The Pitt News’ “Best Of” survey are in, but there’s always more love to share. Fortunately, the opinions staff are here to advocate for the underdogs who fell just short — or incredibly short — of winning our paper’s prestigious award. It may not seem like it, but you will someday tire of Cane’s or Redhawk or Hillman Library. When that day comes, you’ll thank your lucky stars you have a handy B-list of underappreciated Pittsburgh attractions.

Layne’s Chicken Fingers // Thomas Riley, Opinions Editor

Yes, I am a Layne’s apologist. Everyone loves Cane’s, and I doubt anyone is surprised they won Best Chicken this year, but I would hate to see Layne’s left in the dust. Layne’s was there for us for the 1 1/2 months leading up to Cane’s grand opening. Is their breading not quite as crispy as Cane’s? Yes. Is their astronaut-chicken mascot a little strange? Certainly. Did their app not work for half a year, causing me to miss out on two free meal rewards? Sure.

But their fries are better than Cane’s! And they have a clock on the wall labeled “Somewhere” that’s always set to 5 p.m., which made me nudge my friend and say, “Heh, look at that.” It’s also worth mentioning they did come before Cane’s — and not just to Pittsburgh. Cane’s was founded in 1996, but Layne’s was born in 1994. It really doesn’t matter that much, but sometimes people say Layne’s is a knock-off of Cane’s, and I simply can’t bear witness to this blatant historical revisionism.

If I can’t get you to try their chicken, at least grab a milkshake. The prices are reasonable, and the salted caramel flavor is a banger. And to the manager of Layne’s, if you’re reading this, please give me a free three-piece meal. What’s the point of having a birthday if I can’t celebrate by using my in-app reward?

Frick Fine Arts and Cathedral of Learning  // Irene Moran, Staff Columnist

I’m admitting it, I do not enjoy studying in Hillman. I have been in Hillman a solid three times to do my work since starting university. Those three times I was there, I only went because my friend wanted me to go with her, not because I wanted to. 

I’m not a fan of the lighting in Hillman. It reminds me of a hospital, something I obviously don’t want to be reminded of. I prefer a dim setting to study and do my work in, not bright fluorescent bulbs. This is why I prefer to go to Frick or the Cathedral of Learning to do my work. Frick Library may be small, but every time I have been there, I was able to get a seat and do my work. 

Now, when it comes to the Cathedral, you can go almost anywhere. When I see that a nationality room is open, I go in there. When I see that a little corner table is open, I go there. Some people might think that the Cathedral gets too loud at times, but there are so many different floors that you can go to. All you have to do is pick a spot, put your headphones on, do your work and let the ambiance fuel you.

When I’m in Frick or the Cathedral, I always do my work. I tend to not get distracted as much as I do in Hillman. I get distracted pretty easily, but I will lock in and do my homework when I’m in a good study space like Frick or the Cathedral. 

Around this time last year, I had the privilege of going to vote at the Pitt Factor competition on behalf of The Pitt News — an event that chose the opening act to Carlie Rae Jepsen’s concert at the Bigelow Bash. Everyone there was outstanding. There were multiple dance groups, bands and artists showcasing the unbelievable talent that exists on Pitt’s campus. However, one group stood out among the rest and took home the win. And while that one group may not have won TPN’s Best Of competition this year, they are always a winner in my heart. 

Clay Coast // Livia LaMarca, Assistant Opinions Editor

Clay Coast is a local band here in Pittsburgh with a sound that resonates with fans of Lawrence, Owl City and the Beatles. I watched them perform a year ago now but have been stalking their Instagram page since, and their success is palpable. From what I recall from the Pitt Factor event, their stage presence was unmatched and their talent extreme. They brought down the house particularly with a groovy cover of Owl City’s “Fireflies,” a song that resonates with all us Gen Zers. As a longtime singer and musician myself, along with being a huge fan of funk music, I remember absolutely adoring the group for their unique use of the trumpet — an instrument not necessarily seen in the underground Pittsburgh music scene. They are fun, vivacious and, in their own words, “vibey.” With original songs and unorthodox covers of hits we all know and love, Clay Coast stands as a perfect addition to the vibrant Pittsburgh and Oakland music scenes.

Since their opening act for Jepsen, Clay Coast has had a steady performance schedule and played a little over a month ago at the inaugural Post Genre show. Along with that, they have released a slew of original music, including an EP titled “Clocked Out.” Definitely check them out if you are looking for a groovy, funky band in the Pittsburgh area.

The Frick Pittsburgh // Anna Ehlers, Contributing Editor

Out in the Point Breeze neighborhood, The Frick Pittsburgh features a plethora of interests — an art museum, an 18th century house called Clayton, a car and carriage museum and gardens. Art, however, is my forte, so I will be advocating for the art museum facet of The Frick Pittsburgh. 

The Frick offers an art collection featuring Renaissance and other European art as well as Chinese porcelain, finely crafted furniture and antique clothing, many of which were collected by Henry Clay Frick and his daughter Helen. The galleries at the Frick feature richly decorated walls and warm lighting that makes the gold frames of the art shimmer. While I appreciate the merits of all-white walls when presenting art, there’s something truly enchanting about the effects that deep, richly colored walls have on the color schemes of artworks. If you like old buildings as much as me, you’ll truly get a kick out of the creaky floors and bespoke wood paneling. The vibe — dark academia meets Pittsburgh philanthropists with money to burn and a serious appreciation for jewel tones. 

The permanent collection of the Frick Art Museum, as well as the grounds and the Car and Carriage museum, has free entry. If you’re willing to pay, special exhibition tickets are priced at $20 per student. While I consider that to be somewhat pricey, I was impressed by the curatorial expertise when I bought the ticket myself to see the special exhibition. I hate to say it, but art is expensive. If you know you’d enjoy the exhibit, the ticket is worth the price. So go catch that 69 bus and explore a hidden corner of your city! 

PA Taco Co. // Delaney Rauscher Adams, Staff Columnist

My strong yet shockingly unpopular opinion is that PA Taco Co. is the best Pitt Eats meal swap location. I have been consistently surprised at people’s distaste for the taco place, as I often find myself frequenting the WPU for a bowl or chips and salsa. 

The Union food court is the easiest and most central location for meal swaps, and out of the options available, I typically gravitate towards PA Taco Co. when choosing where to order from. The wait for mobile orders is almost never as long as Create or Wicked Pie, but the quality is just as good. From a chips and dip snack to a more filling meal, there is a good variety of options to choose from with the ingredients they offer. The bowls that come with the meal plan combo are yummy and are even better if you add on a side of chips. I can’t say they have the best guacamole in town, but I am a fan of the queso and love to add it on. Even if you aren’t into tacos, grabbing a fresh lemonade is always another great option. 

We all know that Pitt dining locations aren’t always the most budget friendly, but PA Taco Co. always feels like enough food and is my favorite way to treat myself to a little break from the Eatery. 

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